Gas Grill Grease Pans and Drip Trays

What Are Grease Pans and Drip Trays?

New Drip Pan Grease Tray grill part replacement. Material is Galvanized steel and the part is rectangular in shape. There is an American Flag and the Words "Made in America"
GrillPartsSearch.com Now Carries a Line of Replacement Drip Pans
https://grillpartssearch.com/category/GTDP.html

“Help! My bottom’s rusted out!”
You really do hear some pretty entertaining things working in the grill parts industry. Today we’re talking about your grease pan or drip tray.

In the gas grill industry, over the past 5-7 years, manufacturers introduced the concept of a grease pan / drip tray. A decade ago, most grills bodies consisted of just one piece with a hole in the bottom center where food grease dripped into a grease cup. Grillers easily removed the cup, dumped the contents and replaced it.

Then, grill companies moved to grill bodies made out of stainless steel sheet metal. So, they made grills where the bottoms of the grill were separate pieces. While some are riveted together, in most cases, you can remove these pieces. These trays are what we call “grease trays” or “drip pans.”

Why Do These Trays and Pans Rust Out So Quickly!?

Rusted Out Grill with Grid and Heat Plates Visible. Two red arrows point to a spot in the grill where the grease pan is rusted completely through. There is a hole in the grill.
It’s hard to see because this grill has so much rust, but the arrows are pointing to an area in the drip pan that is completely gone and you’re actually looking at the floor.

If you have a stainless steel gas grill, you know that all “stainless” is not created equal. When you grill, you have high heat and moisture in that stainless steel shell that makes up your gas grill. However, high heat plus moisture equals corrosion, even in stainless steel. As a result, you will commonly have a rusted pan or tray long before the rest of the grill rusts. We hear about it on a daily basis.

So What Can You Do?

Unfortunately, it can be very difficult to find a replacement for your grease pan. Manufacturers like Backyard Grill and Dyna-Glo are not in the replacement parts business. Consequently, even if they HAVE the tray you need, it can be very difficult or take a long time to get it. After-market parts companies often do not make replacement drip pans because the cost is so high.

This is why you have to look so hard to find replacement options for your gas grill drip pans and grease trays. However, this year we are proud to offer a trays that fit many models of Dyna-Glo Gas Grills. We have heard from customers some of our trays even fit Backyard Grills as well!

Before ordering a replacement pan, it is extremely important to take out your old pan and measure it.  
You will need the dimensions from front to back and left to right

GrillPartsSearch.com Now Carries a Line of Grease Tray / Drip Pan Replacements.

New Drip Pan Grease Tray grill part replacement. Material is Galvanized steel and the part is rectangular in shape. There is an American Flag and the Words "Made in America"

See our most popular Dyna-Glo Replacement here:
https://grillpartssearch.com/product/dyna-glo-drip-pan-grease-tray-galvanized-steel-15-1-4×28-5-8.html
Once again, please measure your original tray. We have many other sizes listed at the bottom of the product page.

New Drip Pan Grease Tray Liner grill part replacement. A set of four heavy-duty Aluminum pans, rectangular in shape. There is an American Flag and the Words "Made in America"

In addition to the USA-Made trays, we also have some aluminum drip pan liners. You can put these into your existing pan or new pan to extend the life of the part!
You can check those out here:
https://grillpartssearch.com/product/usa-made-medium-drip-pan-aluminum-4-ct.-16-x-11.html

New Drip Pan Grease Tray Liner grill part replacement. A set of three heavy-duty Aluminum pans, rectangular in shape. Include lip and are a replacement for Weber drip pans. There is an American Flag and the Words "Made in America"

Or, are you here for Weber replacement trays? We have those too!
https://grillpartssearch.com/product/weber-drip-pan-aluminum-3-ct-8-x-6.html

It is our goal to provide you with the parts you need. If you are looking for other grill parts, leave us a comment below!

Happy Grillin’! –Grill Girl

Grill Maintenance – Weekly

What are the most important things to do on a weekly basis to keep your grill in good shape?

Rusting is the most common way, especially in grills, that metal deteriorates. You can’t avoid it. The reason is because when you add moisture, high levels of heat, and metal, you’re going to get deterioration – usually in the form of rust. And what does grilling always entail? – Metal, moisture and heat.

In addition to that, there are many different qualities of material available in grills on the market today. If you’d like to know the difference in a $300 grill you can buy on sale at a big box store and a $1200 grill you can buy in a grill specialty store, it’s how it’s made and with what material. Something like cast aluminum doesn’t rust. The only deterioration you’ll see with aluminum is oxidation which occurs over decades instead of months, like rust. It’s more expensive than the stainless steel sheet metal that’s bent into a grill shape. Even among stainless grills, not all stainless steel is created equal. You can read more about the deal with stainless steel in this post.

No matter the material or quality of your grill, there are steps you can take to minimize rust, clean away rust, and help your grill, and grill parts, work for you as long as possible.

  1. Use a BRASS-bristled brush to clean your cooking grid surfaces after you cook your food – while your grill is still warm.
    -Brass is important because it is softer than the coatings on your grid surface. Even if your grid says it’s stainless steel, that could just be a coating! The only time I suggest using a steel bristled brush is when you’re cleaning the inside molding or casting of your grill.
    -Always check for pieces of the brush that might have broken off your brush while you were cleaning. You don’t want to eat that!
  2. Moisture is NOT your friend!
    -Use a cover to protect your grill from rain. If you have an especially fragile (read here cheap) grill, moving it under an awning while it’s not in use is not  a bad idea.
    -I’m a big believer in quality so I don’t like the idea of a grill you have to give so much special attention to – but that’s the reality with most grills under the $300 price point if you want them to last more than 2-3 years.
  3. Notice some rust? Don’t panic!
    -Use your grid brush to remove most of the rust and then rub oil into the area that was rusting. This will seal out the moisture and delay further rusting.
    -It’s a good idea to do this whenever you notice rust in your grill, but also reapply oil before you preheat for cooking.
  4. Preheat before cooking.
    -Preheating your grill not only gets it to the right temperature for cooking your food, it also sanitizes your cooking area! Use your grill’s highest setting for about 15 minutes to preheat and then adjust the temperature when you’re ready to cook.

grill, grilling, clean, brush, brass

Make sure the brush you use has brass bristles and check that no broken off pieces of the brush are left on your cooking surface when you’re ready to grill!

You should get into the habit of taking these steps every time you grill, or at least once a week if you grill often.

There are also some more in depth steps to take when you put your grill away for the season and again when you take it out for the first time each season. Thankfully, here in Georgia, we’re still months away from the end of grilling season!

-GG

Repair or Replace?

As a grill part guru, I tend to lean toward replacing everything in your grill as long as possible. This keeps the grill you love in your backyard and out of a landfill.

However, there are times when even the best grill needs the ol’ heave-ho. (If you have to replace your beloved grill, do it a favor and get something worthy to fill the empty spot on your patio)

Here are a few things to keep in mind.

**If you open the hood of your grill and it looks gross, REPAIR!! (or even, just clean!)

**If your cooking grids, heat plates, or burners are rusted, REPAIR!

**Knobs, ignition parts, regulators, handles are all easy fixes: REPAIR!

**If your valve system is bent or broken, you will need to find a replacement valve to REPAIR your grill. However, sometimes valves are no longer available. You cannot use the wrong valve for your grill, so I recommend at that point REPLACE.

**Major damage to the main body of your grill requires you to REPLACE it. This includes the hood of your grill.

**If you have a grill mounted in the ground with a post that requires a new post, REPAIR!! You can buy a new post and save your grill!

So You Lit Your Grill On Fire

 

If you have any specific questions, feel free to leave me a comment and I’ll answer as quickly as possible!

You can also call 877-244-0737 for friendly advice on all things grills!

-GG

(Is it warm yet!? Gracious!!)

What’s the Deal with Stainless Steel?


There’s a lot of disappointment floating around when it comes to one material currently on the market: stainless steel.

The two main issues are:
1) Why does my “stainless steel” rust?
2) Why is my “stainless steel” magnetic?

I put stainless steel in quotation marks because that’s how most people would phrase the questions. If either of the two above things were accurate, our customers would believe their item must not be stainless steel…

Right?

No, actually that’s not correct. There are different grades of stainless steel and they all act differently when introduced to either heat or water. In our grilling cases, that would be BOTH!!!

To clear it up, the General Manager at GrillPartsSearch.com has written up a guest blog explanation.

Take it away Will!!!

There are two general series of stainless steel grades used in the gas grill industry: 300 series and 400 series.

The 300 series group of alloys are non-magnetic and the basic 300 alloy contains 18% chromium and 8% nickel.
The 400 Series group of alloys are magnetic and the basic 400 alloy contains 11% chromium and 1% manganese. This series offers a much lower cost option in stainless steel parts.
-The 300 series is subject to corrosion at crevice points, while the 400 series has a considerably lower resistance to corrosion in general.

Knowing that, we choose the parts we sell to our customers very carefully! We try to gain as much information as possible about the grades of stainless steel we offer our customers so we can help them know what to expect from the parts they purchase.

Here’s how that information translates in grilling terms:

Cooking grids are exposed to more liquids and less heat, compared to other parts in a grill. We do make some cooking grids (product code: CG63SS) with 316 stainless because of that fact. In the case of cooking grids, the extra expense of the 300 series can be worth it. 300 series stainless is less prone to rust but the less than ideal conditions inside a grill will definitely degrade even the highest quality stainless steel. 304 is the most common type of stainless steel in the world, while 316 is generally the highest grade stainless you will find in ordinary applications, and both will degrade in a grill.

As for burners and heat plates, they certainly are exposed to moisture but are exposed to much more heat. Heat is just as much of an enemy to steel, if not more so, as moisture and oxygen. Heating and cooling are used in the production of metals to actually change the chemical/molecular bonds and subsequent performance of the metal. It is no different inside your grill. While 300 series stainless will technically last longer than a 400 series plate of equal thickness, the benefit is only marginal. That marginal benefit compared to the substantial increase in cost doesn’t really pay off. We have found by spending a little more to make the plate out of a thicker 400 series stainless, you gain close to the same amount of life you would get out of a 300 series product at a fraction of the cost.

If you ever have any other questions about stainless steel or the applications of such in your grill, we’d love to help!
Just give us a call!!

Thanks so much Will!!!

That’s all for now, and don’t forget to ask questions for me, the Grill Girl!!!

Happy Friday!

-GG

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Time to Dust off the Rust – Spring is Coming!!

Hello Fellow Grillers!! It’s January and freezing temperatures even down south here in Georgia. Still, I can’t stop thinking about getting out the grill for the spring. (True true, we never really “put it away”). The very best time in the whole entire year to refurbish your grill is early spring. There are a few reasons for this:

  • Even though you haven’t used your grill much over the cold months, the moisture and cold temperatures have still affected your grill parts.
  • Most people only replace their grill parts when they try to use their grill and can’t for some reason. That creates a lot more volume in the spring and summer months for grill part companies. In other words, buy now and you’ll get more in depth service, better stocked parts inventory, and faster processing/shipping times.
  • Don’t put yourself in a situation where you have 1 or 2 days to get the replacement parts you need. If you run out of propane during a party, at least you can run to the nearest gas station and replace it. Not so with most grill part replacements.

And let’s be honest, it’s very satisfying to get into your grill, determine the problems, get the parts needed, and then go fix it yourself. If it seems like a daunting task, I can promise you there’s no better ally than the customer service dept at GrillPartsSearch.com. I know because I worked with them for years. They want to help you keep your grill out of a landfill and get back to grilling again!!

(Here are some tips on finding your model number)

So what are you waiting for!? Go get rusty!!!

Then, get in touch!

Have fun you! -GG